Accident Scene Training

ASMA-NZ

Having at least one rider who has attended an ASMA-NZ Accident Scene Management Course and can act in a timely and efficient manner will

Save lives

Reduce the possibility of secondary injuries to the victim.

Reduce the risk of others at the scene being injured whilst attempting to help.

Make a booking

Please select your preferred course by clicking the ‘Book now’ button. Payment is either by voucher or by credit card. Payment is required to complete the booking form.

What do I need to bring?

This program is delivered by Paramedic motorcyclists for motorcyclists.
This is an 8 hour course delivered in a classroom so you dont need to bring your motorcycle. This course is suitable for Pillion riders also.

Why an ASMA-NZ Accident Management Course?

Some riders already hold First Aid Certificates but this does not mean they have specific knowledge on how to manage the scene and assess motorcycle crash injuries.
Our programme introduces to motorcycle riders a range of skills and knowledge which has been proven in the USA to result in higher survivability for accident victims and reduced risk to those assisting. These skills are likely to be invaluable in the event of not only motorcycle accidents but all road events requiring assistance and management.

Accident Scene Management Association - NZ

ASMA-NZ teaches a standardised approach to the way motorcyclists conduct themselves to minimise confusion and expedite correct management of the accident victim (s) and the entire scene.

Over 20,000 riders in the USA have been trained in this course since 1996 and since its recent introduction into Australia over 200 riders have been trained (mainly in Victoria but also in NSW).
In the USA, a survey showed 87% of riders say they ride much more aware after doing this course.
No other course giving comprehensive, motorcycle crash specific, bystander assistance training is available in New Zealand, this course is unique and has been developed since 1996 by professional medically trained, motorcycle oriented people.

Where this program has been rolled out to Australian motorcycle riders the benefits are already being seen in anecdotal evidential statistics.

This course is a perfect fit with the desire of the motorcycling community and Government agencies to improve the appalling statistics of motorcycling accident injuries.

Background - New Zealand Motorcyclists Injury and Prevention.

Motorcycling is variously reported as being twenty times more ‘dangerous’ than travelling by car (per kilometre travelled).

Motorcyclists generally speaking suffer more body trauma in serious crashes, and the rider is most likely to be the only one involved in nearly 70% of fatal crashes and 60% of serious injury crashes (MOT Motorcyclist crash fact sheet 2010) of which the following injuries are sustained:

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Leg injuries

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Arm injuries

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Chest / back / spine

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Head injuries

Much of New Zealand’s roading systems favoured by motorcyclists are out of the cities in very picturesque but transport remote areas. This is particularly true for off road or adventure riders as well as road riders. On most recreational rides a small group of friends will travel together. Therefore in the event of an accident involving motorcyclists the reality is that the most likely first person on scene will be a fellow motorcyclist. It is recognised that the initial ten minutes of an event (the platinum window) is the most crucial for the injury assessment and scene management.

  • Instructors were amazing and I learnt a few extra skills/tips which was great!

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  • Thank you so much for the time put into this course

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  • Awesome correction when needed along with praise

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  • The instructors were very helpful and patient gave us very good advice and they checked my rear brake as it wasn’t working

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ASMA-NZ Accident Scene Management - Bystander Assistance Program

Originating in the US in 1996, the Bystander Assistance Programme was developed in response to the need to reduce risk and costs of resultant injury in relation to motorcycle accidents. The goal of the Bystander Assistance Program is to enhance the survival rate and reduce the severity of injuries at the accident scene.

Listen to this video -its a reminder about how we need to take responsibility for managing the risks when we are riding

Background - New Zealand Motorcyclists Injury and Prevention.

Motorcycling is variously reported as being twenty times more ‘dangerous’ than travelling by car (per kilometre travelled).

Motorcyclists generally speaking suffer more body trauma in serious crashes, and the rider is most likely to be the only one involved in nearly 70% of fatal crashes and 60% of serious injury crashes (MOT Motorcyclist crash fact sheet 2010) of which the following injuries are sustained:

This program is delivered by Paramedic motorcyclists for motorcyclists.

Make a booking